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20121201
20121231
SHOW
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KTVU (FOX) 4
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
FOX
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm PST
unit came home to santa rosa in february 2005, ktvu's bob mackenzie was there. >> reporter: families had a long wait to see their soldiers come home. when you're eight or nine and waiting to see daddy who's been away for a year or more time can pass awfully slowly. >> i remember everything and the most thing i remember is the way we always laughed at every joke and every time that it was funny. so i remember his laugh the most. >> reporter: this is daddy? >> yeah. >> reporter: has she talked about him? >> every day. >> reporter: every day. you want to see him? >> yeah, she always wants to know when he's coming home. if he's coming home. >> reporter: zachary hasn't seen his dad for seven months, a long time for a boy who's only 7 years old. but he remembers a lot. >> we went camping and we were going fishing. at night we were playing hide and seek and we could never find him. >> reporter: that's a long time isn't it? >> very long. >> reporter: how do you get through it? >> it's very hard. just pray a lot and you know talk to him and it's very hard. >> reporter: at last 14 national gua
FOX
Dec 30, 2012 11:00pm PST
was not a sport it was a means for waging war. in 2001, ktvu's bob mackenzie brought us the story of the legendary tenth mountain division. >> reporter: in their time they were legendary soldiers. the men of the tenth mountain division could ski, climb mountains, use stealth and hit hard and fast. >> i think it was the best fighting force, it was the only fighting force that i experienced and i can't imagine any fighting force being any better. >> reporter: 60 years later some of the tenth mountaineers get together. sometimes they tell war stories sometimes as a way as exorcises the ghost. >> when we passed him, his brains were just laying out on the ground it was a horrible sight. >> reporter: in 1939 at the outbreak of world war ii, adolph hitler began conquering the nations one by one. when president roosevelt enforced the idea of the fighting force the newly formed tenth mountain division began to train. most were college men already skiers or mountain climbers, athletes by inclination and many had the naive idea that the training was going to be fun. >> you had to learn to cope with the altit
FOX
Dec 9, 2012 11:00pm PST
. and in 2000, bob mckensy brought us the story. >> reporter: for most of us, what we know about this is it supplies bay area cities with drinking water. but before this, there was a beautiful place that looked so much like yosemite it was called the counter part of yosemite. it was a public treasure like its sister valley. city officials felt san francisco was paying too much and when they announced the plan to turn this in a water supply, john muir was outraged. >> no denying san francisco needs water, but you don't need to destroy a national park. >> they saw nothing wrong this and neither did san francisco's mayor. the environmentalist lost the battle and work began on the railroad that would take the supplies there. and they worked on a system to bring the water in to san francisco. it is an impressive system looked at today. this is just a portion of the eight-mile spanning. it relies on gravity, going through a ten-mile tunnel through a drop into the pipe and into the first of two power plants. the big drop turns the turbine and the water going back to make a big drop and
FOX
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm PST
. in 2000, bob mackenzie brought us the history of aaa. >> reporter: in the early days of the century, maneuvering your buggy down the street was not easy. of course you had to be rich to own an automobile which didn't add to their popularity with everyone else. as the second decade began the auto owned the streets in san francisco and other big towns. but it was still the rich who owned them. henry ford changed all that. instead of making cars one at a time, the ford factory mass produced them with an idea called assembly lines. at last regular folks could take to the roads, and in the roaring 20s they did. charging up and down the steep streets of san francisco in an exhilarating triumph of machinery own topography. but outside city limits there were no paveed roads and no road signs. a cloud of dust raised by one automobile made visibility pretty chancy for anyone behind. nonetheless, car owners took their chance bouncing on rocks and that was part of the fun. where there wasn't a road, try a rail track, or a pipeline. all that was fun in the summer. but in winter those dirt roads
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4